Mathematics – S.O.D.A Start Of Day Activity

Teachinglinks.net

  • 15/07/2012 – I am aware of the broken link above.  I understand that SGfL has been decommissioned and have uploaded the files at the bottom of this post. They remain the original, unedited work of SGfL, who placed the files in the public domain.

    06/07/2010 – Great stuff! Maths questions for Years 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6.  There are 10 maths questions per day for each unit from the new framework.  For example, there are 10 PowerPoint slides for unit A1, each with 10 questions – five related to the most recent module (E3 from the previous year) and five reinforcing prior learning (recapping unit A1 from the previous year).  Highly recommended.

_SODA template  _SODA Plan

Year 2

SODA 2A1  SODA 2B1  SODA 2C1  SODA 2D1  SODA 2E1

SODA 2A2  SODA 2B2  SODA 2C2  SODA…

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Star Wars Posters #mtbos #msmathchat

Great resources!
Oh, and if you are a bit of a Star Wars Geek like me… Even better!

Thanks to the original poster.

TeacherPaulP

Instead of writing a syllabus or creating assessments or working on lessons plans, I have procrastinated and scoured some images from the web to make these.

I have uploaded .png’s of these into this folder for downloading.  The 8 math practices and SBG files were made to blow up to 18×24 (although the 8 math icons will be a little pixelated.) The Force and Darkside posters are pixelated when blown up that large, but will still look good!

8 math practices-smGrowth_Mindset_Posterdarksidesbg-small

SBG Poster-plain-sm

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Issue 4 – March 2016

Another great Mag from @primedmagazine

primed magazine

We’re back!

March coverDownload your free copy of Issue 4 here:

PRIMED Issue 4 March 16

The magazine can be read on desktop, tablet or phone. We find that it’s best enjoyed in the iBooks or Kindle apps – you can bookmark your favourite pages and click on links to jump to articles or websites.

It can also be read on Issuu here:
https://issuu.com/primedmagazine/docs/primed_issue_4_march_16

Please help us to continue the success of PRIMED by downloading and sharing the magazine with friends. Join in with the discussion on Twitter @primedmagazine or on Facebook. If you would like to write for future issues, contact us at primedmagazine@gmail.com.

Look out for our new website, coming soon!

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Primary Rocked: Bread, Beer and Roses

Old Primary Head

Twitter can be a soulless space. Its evolutionary track needs a touchy feely strand to it. The best bits of #PrimaryRocks was meeting ‘real people’. That, and talking to ‘real people’ whilst drinking…

I go to a lot of conferences. I’m a head, I have nothing else to do really. What I liked about Primary Rocks was the fact that it was not about slick international speakers (Though there are few better than @HYWEL_ROBERTS) but it was about the right now issues and practice of teachers. It had a grass roots feel. There’s something virtuous about getting up at 5AM to get to Manchester for 9 on a Saturday morning and then sitting in a lovely school surrounded by other positive souls all coming together because they have a love for what they do.

Lucy Powell the shadow secretary kicked off and was way too casual to really have the…

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Digital Leaders

fionathomasict

I originally introduced Digital Leaders in Kings Monkton Primary School in 2012 and we haven’t looked back. They help and support other teachers and children with IT/technology in so many different ways. They are children who range from Year 2 – Year 6 and meet on Monday lunchtimes in the primary computer suite, although you may well see them in this room throughout most lunchtimes.

I first saw Digital Leaders in action at a Teachmeet in Clevedon where @ICTEvangelist, Mark Anderson had them working and helping in the evening as well as presenting. I thought it was a brilliant idea and wondered if you could do this with Primary children.  

At Bett, I then heard @SheliBB, Sheli Blackburn talk with enthusiasm and about her Digital Leaders in a Primary school and it became a goal for me to do the same. I found out more through Twitter and the…

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14 STAR WARS POSTERS FOR EDUCATORS

EDUWELLS

I’m 38 and so automatically love Star Wars. Inspired by the new film, ‘The Force Awakens.’ here are some #StarWars themed Edu posters for all the other educating Star Wars fans out there. I made them using my 10-year-old neighbour Josh’s excellent collection of Lego Star Wars characters – Thanks Josh! Hope you like them!

The Force Awakens-EduWells

The Class a Teacher Talks to-StarWars-EduWellsSTAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.009STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.008STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.007

STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.006b
STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.005STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.004
STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.003
STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.002STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.001STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.010

Thanks to @dannynic for the one above!STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.011STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.012STAR WARS _ EDUWELLS.013

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2015 in review

Thank youEordpress Stat Monkeys!

 

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 1,800 times in 2015. If it were a cable car, it would take about 30 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

ISSUE 1 – SEPTEMBER 2015

primed magazine

It’s finally here!

PRIMED Sept 15 cover

Download your free copy of Issue 1 here:

PRIMED September 2015

The magazine can be read on desktop, tablet or phone. We find that it’s best enjoyed in the iBooks or Kindle apps – you can bookmark your favourite pages and click on links to jump to articles or websites.

Please help us to launch the first issue of PRIMED by downloading and sharing the magazine with friends. Join in with the discussion on Twitter @primedmagazine or on Facebook. If you would like to write for future issues, contact us at primedmagazine@gmail.com.

Thanks for reading – hope you enjoy it!

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Ideas for the 1st week back… 5 quick activities to do outside.

So here we are guys and gals, it’s almost here.

The new year beckons and teachers are trying to reset their collective body clocks, shake of the cobwebs and fire up the work laptops.

alarm-clock-smash-o

You might be starting a new year, class, age group, school or role but what remains the same is getting the children back in the right mindset, enthused and engaged in the excitement and challenges ahead.

The weather is usually reasonable in early September and hopefully your pupils will be all still full of having spent the Summer, damming rivers, climbing trees, digging for treasure and sword fighting with sticks (even if it was only on MineCraft!)

Here are 5 ways you might take children outside to find out a little more about them and what they can do, as always not trying to be clever.

Find your limits if you aren’t a regular goer outside, but what children do and how they behave when you take away the walls will tell you a lot about them.

  1. Playlets

Give them some sticks, leaves, litter, stones and stumps (perhaps a few puppets if you are inclined) and give them a scene or story title to improvise. writingexercises.co.uk/story-t… It’s fun and can be challenging. Getting children to collaborate. Tell them they can include any props they can find.

  1. Read stories and poems

Just take it out of the classroom, perhaps most common thing done outside. Reading poems about nature under trees and sitting on a tree stump can help generate powerful language. Obvious really. Write a poem, line or verse in the soil perhaps – will it be there tomorrow? Hang them on the fence or over the wall, passers by might read them.

Nature's Way - Heidi Campbell

Nature’s Way – Heidi Campbell

  1. Alphabets

A great one for EYFS/KS1 especially, but I’ve found that KS2 enjoy the challenge too. Make the alphabet from what they can find. Size doesn’t matter but creative thought does. Take photographs and print a fabulous natural alphabet for the classroom. Looks good and it is theirs.

  1. Place Value and Numbers

Draw boxes on the playground and use as PV grids. Use any small manipulatives, shells, stones, beads etc to fill the boxes, making numbers. Children can see the quantity in the box and how it has a position, then you can add another above or below and create moving calculations. Children will have that physical connection and see how the number combine and begin to deal with the principles of exchange when there is more than 10(0) – now what?

  1. Go and plant something

On the first day. Go and plant something. Suggestions could be Garlic, Lamb’s Lettuce, or if you want a year’s project, Delphiniums will flower in Summer. What a lovely way to close the year, with the flowers planted on Day 1. Dependent on your green fingeredness! The masses of learning potential from growing flowers, fruit and veg is enormous.

Delphiniums

Delphiniums

But you knew that!

Comment more ideas you have for ‘Starting Outside’.

SEN Information and resources: Let the #SENexchange begin! A collection of websites, charities, bloggers and tweeters

SENexchangeuk

A very warm welcome to all our readers.

For this post we thought it would be useful to share a range of information relevant to the SEND community. We are aware that these lists are by no means exhaustive but this post is designed as a starting point to collate some useful information. Please feel free to suggest additions to the existing lists in the comments section of this post or tweet them to us @SENexchange and we may add it to this post. If there are other lists you think may also be useful to add – let us know your thoughts on that too.

Useful charities and websites:

– National Autistic Society  (NAS) : Leading UK charity for people with Autism (@autism)

– Scope: A charity focussing needs associated with Cerebral Palsy and all disabilities ( @scope)

-British Dyslexia Association ( @BDAdyslexia)

– The Muscular Dystrophy Association

– The Down’s…

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Well Being – The need for selfawareness

Wellbeing – we have all heard the phrase and are often reminded to consider it.

I have read a few blogs about it recently:

@tstarkey1212‘s – Balance (The 1st EduBlog I ever read)

@mrheadcomputing‘s:

My Own Worst Enemy Pt1

My Own Worst Enemy Pt2

There are others, they are popping up because it is half term. Teacher’s ‘Me Time’ – yeah right!


I am not sure where this post leads – to be honest it is a bit of a brain dump. So please don’t hate me if I draw no conclusions or solutions. There might be some advice, but I suspect I am advising myself more than trying to help others!

I am, I suspect, a workaholic. I am reasonably confident that many teachers are. They just use words like ‘professional’,  ‘committed’ and ‘driven’ to hide behind. I like to think I am these things too. I should be. But when is enough truly enough?

Not all that long ago I think that I found that point.

I didn’t look after myself properly. Slept little. Snacked badly. Drank to much coffee (in my own opnion). I worked. Literally all the time. Did it make me better? I don’t know.

I DO know that I got into some really bad habits. Over preparing, 2nd guessing myself – 3rd guessing sometimes!

What I do works, however I am not sure that all the extra made a real difference.

We all know about workload: planning, marking, assessment etc. etc. it is a burden but one we have to bear.

So, I suffered.

Tiredness, exhaustion, stress, depression, alienation from family and friends. No-one’s fault but my own ‘commitment’.

My family suffered. They lost me. Evenings and weekends evaporated. We didn’t do things together because I was ‘too busy’.

I am a workaholic and I have a problem.

There I said it.

I have forced myself to slow it down, stop it or do a little less, but the danger of a relapse is always there and it won’t be going away anytime soon.

gifsoup.com

gifsoup.com

How do you:

  • Teach full time
  • Lead a school
  • Senior Lead across 2 schools
  • Subject lead 3 subjects (one is Maths)
  • Support colleagues
  • Stay creative and interesting
  • Have a young family
  • Live a family life

Perhaps the key to my problem is the order of the list?

I have as many hours as everyone else and as many days. A little extra at the end of the month is great, although it won’t bring back lost days out, bedtime stories missed, bathtimes avoided (the little person’s not mine!), glasses of wine and conversation with my wife.

I think that my point here is to watch for the signs – I didn’t.

Have a break.

Rest.

It isn’t enough to not work on a friday night – to sit down to watch NCIS instead and be asleep before the 1st grey fade, then shouted at for the next hour for snoring too loud.

en.wikipedia.org

en.wikipedia.org

It isn’t enough.

There must be time out – find it or you cannot and will not last the course.

If I hated my job – I would stop. The problem is, that actually, I don’t.

theoverthinker.org

theoverthinker.org

What have I done?

  • I have a cut off time – 3am in BAD, 10pm is BETTER.
  • I make better lists, ones that I can realistically complete – prioritise.
  • Bedtime is sacred (again, not mine, the small one’s)
  • I tweet – Hardly a hobby, but it is something I enjoy.
  • I do things for me, that I want to do. Even if they are ‘work’ related – they are mine!

My advice to you?

Be careful. You do not have to commit body, mind, soul, guts and glory to your class.

Be happy, be healthy, smile, laugh and be ready for them – they’ll love you. If you aren’t, then you’ll lose them forever.

All too often I read motivational memes like:

I am a teacher. What’s your superpower?

or

Teaching is my superpower!

It isn’t.

It IS a very important job – perhaps one of the most important. But you are not super human.

If I was Superman – teaching is my Kryptonite.

g8ors.blogspot.com

g8ors.blogspot.com

My downtime, rest and regeneration? That is the source of my power. That is my sun.

Like Superman, if I only have kryptonite, I become weaker and lose that power.

All superheroes have their weakness or breaking point (except He-Man, but that’s another blog!)

Know your limitations.

Remember that if you don’t look after yourself, then the job will not look after you.

giphy.com

giphy.com

The machine keeps turning.

Thanks for reading.


Please forgive errors!

This has been a tough write and sharing is even more scary.

Mike

Paul Barrett – A Tribute – A man who taught by nature and by accident.

I lost a friend recently.

Cancer.

I don’t know what type.

I am not sure that it matters and even though I hadn’t seen him for perhaps 4 years – it upset me.

Paul was not an especially close friend, but someone I held a close affection for and some for whom I had a lot of time. One of those friends who I would see for maybe 3-4 months a year and then not at all for the other 8-9.

He and I played cricket together for the local village team until the club folded. He had played for the club for over 25 years, despite having to travel from Sheffield to Lincoln every weekend of the season. It was just what he did, because he loved to do it. We couldn’t get people to walk across the road to the playing field on a Sunday afternoon, but Paul would be there. Larger than life, the wrong side of a 40 mile drive.

When I say larger than life I do mean it. Paul was 5’10” and 26st. One of the gruffest, most uncouth, foul mouthed and delightful Yorkshireman anyone could wish to meet.

I realise that this is an education blog so allow me to explain why I am writing this tribute to Paul here. He was not a teacher, not professionally, not conventionally. He was not a man who would grace a classroom (for long), but he could teach and did every time he took the field.


Everyone knew Paul, literally everyone. He had been around for so long, played everywhere, talked to anyone, had a beer with whoever. We were just glad that he was on our team. Bright red football socks over his whites (which were rarely white), fluorescent pink jockstrap (enough said really), false teeth, floppy red hat, 4 1/2lb of Willow (the biggest and heaviest bat any one had ever seen!) and the unerring skill to batter 4s and 6s for fun, even though he was never a fan of a quick single (unless to steal the strike for the next over). Something Paul taught you very quickly was ‘don’t run, there’s no point, I won’t be’. He made damn sure you could count to 6.

Paul and I doing the books

Paul and I doing the books

He also taught you not to judge a book by its cover. Paul was an expert bowler, not a ‘pie-chucker’ as his build suggested but a skilled swing, seam and spin bowler who could ‘think’ a batsman out better than anyone I ever played with or against. He could also week in and out, bowl 10 overs straight through, I couldn’t run in for more than 3 without needing medical assistance. Yet there he was, all 26st, ball after ball, giving away little and always near the top of the averages and leading wicket takers.

The Man the Legend

The Man the Legend

While this may prove to be a short post – there is a point.

I am no talented cricketer, I have ‘all the gear and no idea’, but by playing the game with Paul, I learned plenty and many more would say the same thing.

He believed in the spirit of the game, that it should be played fairly and no matter win, lose or draw, as long as everyone could say ‘they did their best’, he was happy. If you couldn’t say that, he would tell you why you didn’t and how you should have – and you’d listen. Because it was Paul.

People respected him for the fact that he did it his way and if you didn’t like it, tough, it was his way, you didn’t have to like it.

Paul always felt that younger players had to do their part.

Paul always felt that younger players had to do their part.

One of the finest lessons he ever taught me (and this is where I will conclude this eulogy) was when he once berated a team mate who was shouting at a young lad who had mis-fielded a simple ball and allowed a boundary from his bowling.

Paul ‘explained’ that there was no point in that action, it didn’t help. The lad knew he had messed up, he didn’t do it on purpose and he wouldn’t be trying to repeat the mistake – in fact why get cross at all? He was doing enough telling off of himself in his own head – why not say something nice to make him feel better?

Oh, and don’t bowl another sh*t ball like that, that gets hit over there!

Paul 'Bash' Barrett 1964 - 2014

Paul ‘Bash’ Barrett
1964 – 2014

Paul Barrett

1964 – 2014

Rest in Peace Bash

A lot of people miss you.

2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 4,600 times in 2014. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

My nominations for the Edublog Awards 2014 #eddies14 –

The Edublog Awards is a community based incentive started in 2004 in response to community concerns relating to how schools, districts and educational institutions were blocking access of learner and teacher blog sites for educational purposes.

The purpose of the Edublog awards is promote and demonstrate the educational values of these social media.

The best aspects include that it creates a fabulous resource for educators to use for ideas on how social media is used in different contexts, with a range of different learners.

(from: http://edublogawards.com/about-the-edublog-awards/)

This year’s nomination categories are:

  • Best individual blog
  • Best individual tweeter
  • Best group blog
  • Best new blog
  • Best class blog
  • Best student blog
  • Best ed tech / resource sharing blog
  • Most influential blog post
  • Best twitter hashtag
  • Best teacher blog
  • Best librarian / library blog
  • Best School Administrator blog
  • Best free web tool
  • Best educational use of audio / video / visual
  • Best educational wiki
  • Best educational podcast
  • Best open PD / unconference / webinar series
  • Best educational use of a social network
  • Lifetime achievement

(From: http://edublogawards.com/about-the-edublog-awards/)


I would like to share my nominations here.

I haven’t nominated in every category but I have in most.

My Nominations for the Edublog Awards 2014:

 

  • Best Individual Blog

http://michaelt1979.wordpress.com

A seemingly endless supply of resources for curriculum and assessment. Michael has the ability to post excellent commentary of the issues of the day.

 

  • Best Group Blog

http://educationechochamber.wordpress.com/

The task of collecting blog posts from around the web and maintaining this mix is challenging, yet always a good place for interesting and thought provoking read.

 

  • Best New Blog

https://friendlyneighbourhoodteacher.wordpress.com/

@GazNeedle is developing a really useful blog sharing his thoughts, ideas, experiences and reflections

 

  • Best Class Blog

http://davyhulmeyear5.primaryblogger.co.uk/

Lee Parkinson’s class blog leaves me in awe of the fabulous experiences he shares with his class!

 

  • Best Ed Tech / Research Sharing Blog

http://mrparkinsonict.blogspot.co.uk

Again Lee Parkinson, his knowledge of new apps and tech is second to none. As is his willingness to share it.

 

  • Best Teacher Blog

http://www.mathematicshed.com/index.html

Graham Andre’s site is a resource which grows on a daily basis. Along with his good nature and keenness to collaborate.

 

  • Most Influential Blog Post

http://michaelt1979.wordpress.com/2014/07/28/primary-curriculum-resource-pack/

I would love to know just how many schools have used Michael Tidd’s resources in developing their own curriculum and assessment?

I know that I did!

 

  • Best Individual Tweeter

http://twitter.com/ASTsupportAAli

Twitter Coaching, Culture Box, his Agility Toolkit, Teach Meets – Amjad is involved in what I consider some of the best of Twitter.

 

  • Best Hashtag / Twitter Chat

#primaryrocks

The first Primary focused edchat on Twitter – Mondays 8-9 pm UK time.

Getting bigger and bigger each week!

 

  • Best Free Web Tool

https://padlet.com

One I have only recently started to use – but it is a mightily impressive collaboration tool.

 

  • Best Use of Media (Video, Podcasts, etc.)

http://www.literacyshed.com

Rob Smith’s multimedia site is a vast archive of video resources for every possible occasion and purpose.

I wonder what we did before it!?

 

  • Best Educational Use of a Social Network

http://www.aussieed.com/ #aussieED

The network of educators from Australia has grown into a global brand now. I feel privileged to be a tiny part of that network. It’s high level blend of innovation, collaboration and education is very impressive.

 

  • Best Mobile App

Alan Peat’s Exciting Sentences

One of the best apps I have ever used in a classroom.

Alongside its partner Pupil Edition, Exciting Sentences can have a dramatic impact of pupil’s writing.


Make your nominations here:

EduBlog Award Nominations

Thank you for reading, blogging and tweeting.

Mike

 

 

Does Blogging Empower Teachers?

cazzypotsblog

image

Late in 2012, I decided I’d start writing a local history blog. Although, having been an English teacher for the last 19 years, this possibly wasn’t the most logical choice. I did write one history post, but it wasn’t long before I realised that I had far more to say about issues that were happening In the world of education.

In order to provide myself with a bit of anonymity, I removed my real name from my Twitter account and drafted an article about the GCSE exam boundaries. The article was published in an online political magazine, and I was delighted.

Over the next few months, I had several articles published online. However, because they were featured in a general politics mag, the audience for these was sometimes very small. So in July last year, I decided to set up my own blog site. Thanks to the support of several…

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Some Ofsted comments from reports – new things to look out for?

missdcoxblog

Check uniform

IMG_0099.PNG</

The school was given ‘good’. Data not everything?

IMG_0101.PNG</

Speaking ‘ad hoc’ to parents. Wouldn’t be as accessible in secondary?

IMG_0100.PNG</

Adult behaviour was watched. Does this define British values as listening, communication and respect?

IMG_0102.PNG

Check uniform standards again

IMG_0104.PNG

Don’t celebrate inappropriately

IMG_0106.PNG

Don’t tell children their answers are ‘brilliant’ when they’re not!

IMG_0105.PNG

Make sure classrooms are ‘attractive’ and ‘clutter free’

IMG_0107.PNG

And organised

IMG_0110.PNG

Ensure broad and balanced curriculum

IMG_0109.PNG

Ensure behaviour is ‘superb’

IMG_0108.PNG

And finally don’t shock your staff!

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The #CultureBox Experience – The story so far…

I had been scrolling idly through my Twitter timeline one evening and stumbled across a tweet from Amjad Ali (@ASTsupportAAli) using the #culturebox with a link which I duly followed as it had perked my curiosity.

The link led me here:  http://cheneyagilitytoolkit.blogspot.co.uk/2014/08/culturebox.html

(or somewhere close!)

An opportunity to link with another school somewhere in the world?

That sounded exciting and I signed myself up immediately!

Time passed and I eventually discovered that I was unlucky – the odd man out so to speak, the only teacher not to be paired up with another school (to be fair, my potential partner school had pulled out.) I was disappointed but happy to wait until the next opportunity…until I received a Tweet from Amjad, offering me a pairing with Brett Salakas (@MRsalakas), one of the top names in #aussieED, the massive Sunday morning twitter chat… I was delighted to accept!

Brett Salakas #aussieED

Brett Salakas
#aussieED

I honestly don’t think I could have been paired with anyone better.

It has already opened my eyes to new technologies. I had my first ever Google Hangout chat with Brett, and spend an hour laughing and chatting about our schools, jobs, different contexts, sharing information about our classes, teaching philosophies and more. Brett came across as an eminently likable and engaging character, who I not only shared a great deal in common with but we also look ever so slightly similar!

Perhaps the biggest lesson for Brett was what was to become our catchphrase “Don’t say Bloody!”

In Australia, an innocent word used by teachers, adults, pupils and children alike, in the UK a swear word, albeit a very mild one. That one gave us a giggle!

Speak No Evil! pixgood.com

Speak No Evil!
pixgood.com

We realised that the only disadvantage of our pairing was the timezone difference: 9-10 hours (depending on daylight savings). It was highly unlikely that the children in each school will ever get to meet each other. The UK school day starts at around 6pm for Australia and the Australian day starts at 11pm.

We decided that this shouldn’t stop us as we were too excited to get started and do some live broadcasts to each others schools. Especially Brett – he was literally buzzing with excitement and to be fair it was infectious. If the children couldn’t meet each other, they could certainly meet us!

I set my class a piece of homework: #CultureBox

This got them thinking about their own culture and that of another country – the children were as excited as we were.

I put a display in a shared area of school:

#CultureBox Display

#CultureBox Display

Hangout 1:

We set a date and time to have Brett link up to our school, but the time zones cursed us and unfortunately he missed the call.

He may or may not have been asleep! (Curses Time Zones!)

After a stream of apologetic DMs on Twitter, Brett was forgiven and we tried again a few days later this time at the start of our day.

Brett was fantastic!

We chatted for a bit and spoke of time zones, animals, Aboriginal history, British Colonization, Christmas tradition in Australia, as many children in my class thought the whole of Australia go to the beach!

#AussieEd Blog – Brett’s reflections on the 1st CultureBox meeting

It was a great experience for me and for them.

When it ended they wanted to know when we would be doing it again!

It wasn’t long.

Hangout 2:

My class had been learning about traditional tales and fables and other short stories, so we used another live link for Brett to share a ‘Dream Time’ story about Tiddalick the frog:

What a great experience – tales shared from another country, literally as far away from them as you can go without leaving the planet!

Even more exciting this time was that the Hangout was recorded live and streamed to YouTube – Brett felt his nerves let him down and he removed the video – he shouldn’t have.

#AussieED blog – Brett’s reflections on our 2nd CultureBox meeting

Hangout 3:

My turn followed a week or so later once the Aussie kids had returned to school.

It was my turn for a late night!

At 11pm Hangout went live into Brett’s classroom – delightful children – we had a great chat and a laugh too. The conversation and questions that came at me were almost identical in content to the questions my class had asked – if Culture Box teaches me nothing else it is that children are the same wherever you are!

WatsEd Live to Sydney

WatsEd Live to Sydney

It is not often I find myself without something to say, but I was genuinely lost for words when the link up started – such a cool thing to do. The children nursed me through and by the end we were mimicking each others accents and discussing farming, weather, food, hobbies, all sorts of stuff.

I with my ‘cultural’ cup of tea and digestive biscuit in hand!

We discovered:

a) The children didn’t know what a Badger was

b) The children didn’t know what a Yorkshire Pudding was (!)

and

c) I sound weird to them. (Fair enough – I sound weird to everyone!)

The chat ended with me being left with a challenge… share and traditional english poem, and discuss the features and why I chose it.

That’s going to be a tough one… but I am looking forward to it!

Oh, and the class told me they “had a bloody great time!”

I told them I had done too, and that if I said that to my own class I’d be in LOTS of trouble – they thought that was bizarre!

 

Now we are in discussions with our children to think what we can put into a parcel to send to Mr Salakas and his class that sums up ‘Being British’, their homework activity gave a few thoughts. It will be great to share a real life #CultureBox!

 

To those who dreamed the idea up Amjad and Maggie @madgiemgEDU – thank you. You have opened a window on the world to my class and hopefully a class in Australia.

You have linked me with a teacher who is an all round nice bloke and given the children I teach a chance to meet him too.

I can’t wait to keep the project moving!

UPDATED POST – Literacy Shed Conference – Lincolnshire

A Trip Too Far?

This is a great example of when an Educational Visit adds tangible and genuine value to the life experiences of children.
Well prepared and supported by informed and knowledgeable staff the children were able to move beyond their difficulties and experience a day that made their learning real and in context.
My feelings on this are very corporate – but as I have a vested interest in children’s experiences of learning outside school, I wanted to share this with as many people as possible.

cazzypotsblog

An English Trip to Shakespeare’s Birthplace

imageFor the last fourteen years I have taught English to secondary-aged pupils at a Pupil Referral Unit in the Midlands. Many of these students are vulnerable and complex, some are in care, and a large number have severe behavioural difficulties. All of this means that we must be especially cautious when choosing a location for school trip. Notwithstanding the risks, last summer I made the decision to take a KS3 group to visit Shakespeare’s birthplace, in Stratford-upon-Avon.

This was as part of an English topic we were doing on the theme of ‘Performance’. We’d already studied The Globe Theatre, in context, and learned about some of its fascinating history. More importantly, perhaps, we’d looked at extracts from some of Shakespeare’s plays and also studied plot synopses and analysed a selection of quotes.

Now, I must confess that I was dreading this trip. As the…

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To plan or not to plan? Please RT as there are misconceptions.

Wise words.
Which I hope are headed by those that are either mistaken, or trying to over control and micro manage.

cherrylkd

I’m not an authority on education matters but I do try and keep myself up to date with the latest decisions affecting teachers. So when I see a misconception on twitter I generally choose to ignore it and move on. We’re all entitled to our own opinions and that’s fine by me. Just sometimes you see something that is blatantly wrong and shouldn’t be ignored. Some things are detrimental to the profession and some things are detrimental for our work life balance. 

It all started on Tuesday morning with a tweet from @Vickiteaches

‘How often do you hand your planning in? Anyone else do it on a weekly basis like me? This is before we have taught the lessons!’

I answered her by asking why she had to hand her plans in. Did her SLT not trust her? 

This simple statement from me unleashed a debate which lasted for two…

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